H-Leg Dining Table

I you saw my recent post for the J-pedestal table or follow me on social media then you knew this one was coming. If not then right when you get done enjoying this post then head over there. Nevertheless, the story goes, we were planning for Thanksgiving dinner this year and realized that we had a lot of people coming and no where to put them. So we came up with the brilliant idea of having Thanksgiving dinner in the workshop and making two huge dining table to boot. So naturally Jamie shot over to Pottery Barn and picked out a couple tables to use as inspiration. This table was based off the $2200 Stafford Dining Table. We built this one to be an outdoor table for when the spring comes so we built it out if cedar to naturally withstand the elements and gapped the boards for the top to allow drainage. This plan could easily be modified for an indoor table by using the top design seen on the J-pedestal table of just adding a 2×6 to the top and not gapping the boards. Either way, I hope you enjoy this project and video to go with it! Cheers!

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Materials

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Dimensions

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Cut List

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How to build a H-Leg Outdoor Dining Table

If you decide to take on this project I highly recommend you download the printable PDF below to have with you during the build. To do so just click the button below and subscribe to get weekly updates. In return I’ll instantly email you the PDF for free! It’s a win-win.

Download Printable PDF

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Questions? Comments?

As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to comment below and especially don’t forget to post pictures of your finished products in the comments! ENJOY!

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  • Drew Carpenter

    I like this one, too! Thick & “chunky.”
    Very interested to see if the pocket hole joinery holds up outdoors as the wood expands and contracts. Everything I’m seeing from other builders is floating tenons (don’t know if I have the jargon right), not screws.
    ~Drew

    • Paul Ferrario

      I can’t wait to try this. I will put my faith in the rocket scientist 🙂

    • Thanks Drew! And I’m not worried about the pocket hole joinery. I’ve built many pieces like this with no issues.

  • Peter Rondeau

    Thanks for these designs! I’ve been looking for a sturdy design for table legs so I can build a table out of my IPE wood (“Ironwood”) deck scraps, they are very heavy.
    Any insight in how to build the bench pictured with the Staford table? I have a 48″ long piece that would be perfect for a bench to this table..In the picture it makes the legs on the table look like they 6×6 and the bench 4×4, but the description says the table legs are 4×4, so maybe the bench legs are a smaller size?
    I’m still debating between PT lumber, Cedar lumber, of IPE/Mahogany.. Probably knotty cedar.