Lybrook Side Table

Lybrook DIY Side Table Plans - Rogue Engineer 2

A side table is a must have in any living room and we’ve been wanting to replace our glass top side table for a while now. We stumbled across a table similar to this that cost a whopping $340 and we really liked it. Below I’m going to show you how to build a similar table for under $20, with limited power tools and easily within a weekend. Enjoy!

And if you are looking for the matching coffee table you can find that here!

Lybrook Coffee Feature

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Lybrook DIY Side Table Plans - Rogue Engineer 1

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Dimensions

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Dimensions

Cut List

 

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Cut List

How to build a Side Table for under $20

If you decide to take on this project I highly recommend you download the printable PDF below to have with you during the build. To do so just click the button below and subscribe to get weekly updates. In return I’ll instantly email you the PDF for free! It’s a win-win.

Download Printable PDF

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 1

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 1

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 2

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 2

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 3

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 4

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 3

Finishing

We opted to distress and stain before final assembly. We went with American Walnut from Varathane followed by a single coat of semi-gloss triple thick polyurethane.

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 5

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 4

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 6

DIY Lybrook Side Table Plans - Step 7

Questions? Comments?

As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to comment below and especially don’t forget to post pictures of your finished products in the comments! ENJOY!

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  • rhiannon

    So doing these this weekend! Yall are re-furnishing my house! Love it

    • Haha Rhiannon! That’s awesome.. can’t wait to see how it turns out!

  • Billy

    Oh you have to do a matching coffee plan! I’m going to need to match my 2 side tables ;0)

  • Charley Fox

    quick question on the 50 degree angles, how did you do it with a miter saw. Mine only goes up to 48 degrees & i had to go old school with an old miter table.

    • My Ryobi goes to 47 on one side and 52 on the other side. My ridgid goes all the way to 65! But hey, old school works too!

  • The Make-Do Queen

    I really need to buy a miter saw.

  • M. J. Lambert

    Absolutely love the plans that you share. Thanks for your time.

  • Roger Schlemmer

    The materials list and the cut list of the 2x4s do not match.

  • darrell

    this is one neat table… are you using tite-bond glue or gorilla glue.. i haven’t used the gorilla glue yet but curious is it any good..

    • Thanks Darrell! It is always a good idea to glue the joints for added strength. Gorilla glue works great as does titebond and Elmer’s. For an application like this it’s not critical but for some other applications you may want to be more picky.

  • Anika

    Love this table! Really cool plans!

  • Robert Williams

    I went and got the boards today. Going to build this tomorrow!!!!

    • Awesome! I would love to see a pic when you’re done!

  • Shannon Baklund Brey

    Question for you, when you are making a tabletop with pocket screws, do you use glue also? I feel that I should know the answer to this but I’m building a smaller (50 x30…(4) 1 x 8″) table today and am questioning everything!

    • Glue will definitely make for a stronger joint. But, most of the time I choose not to because getting the glue out of the seams can be a real pain, and if you don’t, you’ll never get an even stain. With 1x8s you won’t have seams as much so clean up should be easier.

  • Robert Williams

    Here it is with Minwax Colonial Maple stain. Hope I did you project some justice.

    • That looks awesome Robert!! Thanks for sharing. It’s nice to see it in a lighter color.

  • Zach Drew

    I decided to do mine with an antiqued dining table finish. Walnut stain with sanded white over the top.

  • Zach Drew

    I decided to do mine with an antiqued dining table finish. Walnut stain with sanded white over the top.

  • Thomas Mahoney

    Love this end table! Thanks for another great design.

  • Mitchell Epps

    I’m confused by the cut sheet. How do you get 8 12 1/4″ boards from 8′ lumber?

    • Because it is cut at an angle. The opposite side is shorter.

  • Jenna Spadt

    We are right in the middle of this project. The angles on the 2×4’s that are supposed to be 40 and 50 degrees don’t match up. They are misaligned and it doesn’t come out as an “X.” Shouldn’t they be 45 degrees? Or am I missing something? Thank you.

    • No, they should be 40 and 50, with the 50 being against the center board where the X comes together. You could do them all at 45 but the lengths would change.

  • Meggan Humphrey

    I don’t suppose you happen to have plans for this same table but with different dimensions do you? Lol