Wood Plank Loveseat

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Rogue Engineer

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Rogue Engineer

The new Varathane reclaimed stain colors inspired me to create this awesome planked outdoor loveseat. Who doesn’t need more outdoor seating. This planked loveseat would be a great addition to any outdoor space. Enjoy!

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DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Rogue Engineer

Materials

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Dimensions

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Dimensions

Cut List

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Cut List 1 DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Cut List 2

How to build an Outdoor Wood Plank Loveseat

These free and easy DIY plans will walk you through, step by step, exactly how to build an outdoor wood plank loveseat with reclaimed wood (or faux reclaimed wood). No woodworking experience required.

Download Printable PDF

Finishing

Loveseat Finishing

Loveseat Finishing  AW

Loveseat Finishing  RS

Loveseat Finishing  BB

Loveseat Finishing  VA

Loveseat Finishing  K

Unlike most projects, since these boards are all different colors the staining must be done up front. For this project the frame is stained with Varathane’s Kona and the planks are stained with Vintage Aqua, Bleached Blue, Rustic Sage, and Antique White (bottom to top). After the stain dried we distressed the edges with 220 grit sand paper.

Disclosure: This post was sponsored by Rustoleum. While I received compensation for including their products I was going to anyway (but don’t tell them that ;)) and all the opinions are mine.


DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Step 1

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 1

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 2

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 3

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 4


DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Step 2

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 5

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 7

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 8


DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Step 3

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 9


DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Step 4

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 10

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 11


DIY Planked Wood Loveseat Plans - Step 5

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 12

DIY Planked Wood Loveseat - Step 13

Questions? Comments?

As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to comment below and especially don’t forget to post pictures of your finished products in the comments! ENJOY!

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  • Jason

    This looks awesome! Great job! Even down to the stain choices. Maybe I missed it in the article but where did you get the cushions? Is the bench dimensioned so that it uses common pillow sizes or something?

    • Thanks Jason. They are from HomeDepot, the Martha Stewart Collection. There is a link for the cushions in the materials list of the post. I built the loveseat off the cushion dimensions , however it should work with any standard outdoor cushion.

  • Denny

    I really like what you post- your plans are so easy to follow. Every thing I have seen that you posted is great!. Keep up the good work.

    • Thanks Denny! I appreciate your feedback. I’ll keep the plans coming as long as I have readers like you. Thanks again.

  • Mohammed

    Really nice, and great job.I do like the simplicity and creativity of your plans.
    although the standard sizes of the materials are different here in Australia but I’ll build one for my new house.
    Many Thanks to you Jamison.

  • Johnny

    May be first project I attempt. Only question, how was 17deg cut made? Miter saw?

    • Awesome Johnny! Those can be made with a miter saw. I suggest you hold the wood vertically and rotate the miter saw that way (don’t lean it over), if that make sense. Good luck and happy building!

  • Jamie

    Jamison, I’ve been looking at your handy work, plans and instructions, and I have to say It looks like you are working up some quality creations and making them simple to understand and follow. Thank you! I’ve resigned myself to giving this love seat a try, and maybe down sizing it to make a couple of similar chairs. I can’t wait to see what comes of it! I’m thinking of doubling the ends and halving the width to make chairs, and use the same cushions for both the chairs and loveseat we’ll see. Thanks so much for taking the time to get your ideas out there!

    • Thanks so much Jamie! Great name by the way. (my wife’s name and my childhood name) That sounds like a great idea though. The only issue I see is that the back cushions are tapered on the outside corners. Best of luck and happy building!

  • Colin McClure

    I just finished this project yesterday. I’ve been following your site for a while now for inspiration on projects, but this is the first project I built using your (almost exact) design. Only difference in mine is that I am buying outdoor cushions from a fabric store that are each 22″x22″, so mine is narrower than yours (51″ rather than 65″).

    One thing I would point out for others that are going to try this build is that this is definitely a low couch. With my 4″ thick cushions, the height to the top of the cushion is 15″. Of course I should have realized this before I got started because it is pretty clear on the plans. I had some spare heavy duty casters with brakes lying around, so I threw those on the legs to add 3″ inches, and now my couch is about 18″ to the top of the cushion (a little lower than average, but still comfortable). The casters give it the extra height it needs, and allows you to easily rearrange (because it is heavy!). My couch staying in my shop so the industrial look of the casters works, plus I don’t care if they mark up my floor. If you are building this, you might want to consider adding wheels/legs like I did, or maybe add a 2×6 to all three sides, and raise everything up by 5-6 inches.

    Other than that, this was a super easy build and I love the look of it. The slight slope in the seat and the angles on the back support are perfect, and the idea of the four different stained boards looks awesome. Thanks Jamison for this amazing site and the easy to follow plans!

    • Hey Colin! Thanks so much for sharing and thanks for pointing out that it is a low couch. I guess it’s technically considered deep seating which is more of a lowrider type seating. Thanks again!

  • Getting ready to build this but want to extend it too a couch size. But seems like this thing will be a monster. Do you think it will need center supports to keep from sagging? I have seen some couch designs over on Ann whites site but none of this seem as beefy as this one. All the 2x6s seem to even be a little overkill but I like it 🙂

    • Haha. They are very much overkill. This thing is a beast and those 2x6s will be more than enough to span the width of a couch. I think you’ll be more than fine without center supports.

  • Todd Lyons

    Curious if this should be made out of cedar or pressure treated wood to prevent weather damage?

    I’m in New England and weather is a concern.

    • With a good protective coating it should be okay if only subject to mild outdoor conditions. However, cedar or pressure treated would be even better in your case.

  • Nathan Kirtlan

    This project is now my couch. Thanks for the plans, it turned out great! As you can tell it met my inspectors standards.

    • HAHA that is awesome! Thanks for sharing and glad the inspectors approved on the design.

  • JHPalmer

    I would love to know how the Varathane stain has held up. I LOVE the look, but I am concerned about it being an interior product. Did you poly over it? Has it aged well? –Julie

    • I always recommend using a poly over top for indoor or outdoor use. I’ve used Varathane stains on many of my outdoor pieces and it holds up great.

      • Mark Mos

        Did you use a wood conditioner before staining, I noticed on the can I had it said no wood conditioner required but my pine still came out a little blotchy.