Monastery Dining Table

Monastery Dining Table - Free DIY Plans - Rogue Engineer

Believe it or not we’ve had a dining room table that we wanted to replace for years now but just never got around to it. That is until now. Jamie found a Monastery Table that she really liked so I took that inspiration and added my own twist on it. As always, I’ve included the free DIY plans for you all to make your very own! Enjoy!

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Monastery Dining Table - Free DIY Plans - Rogue Engineer

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Dimensions

DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Dimensions

Cut List

DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Cut List

How to build a Monastery Dining Table

Download Printable PDFDIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Step 1 Monastery DIning Table - Step 1

DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Step 2 DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Rogue Engineer 1

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DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Rogue Engineer 8 Please disregard the stupid iPhone filter that accidentally got turned on and cannot be seen in the sun. 🙁

DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Step 3 DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Rogue Engineer 9

I added the 2x4x28-3/8" here because I didn't have 3" wood screws.

I added the 2x4x28-3/8″ here because I didn’t have 3″ wood screws.

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DIY Monastery Dining Table Plans - Step 5

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  Download Printable PDF

Finishing

My wife, Jamie, decided to finish the base of this table with Carrington wood stain from Rustoleum and paint the table top with the new Serenity Blue Chalked paint from Rustoleum. After distressing the top she then applied a finishing wax to seal.

Questions? Comments?

As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to comment below and especially don’t forget to post pictures of your finished products in the comments! ENJOY!

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  • Amy

    I love the table, it’s gorgeous! (and I really love the rug, where is it from?) Thanks 🙂

  • Jason

    Hi, love the Monastery Table, one question, how does it do with expansion and contraction of the wood? I’m a beginner woodworker and all I read is how pocket holes don’t allow for expansion. I love the look but want it to last a long time as well.

    Thanks!

    • I haven’t had any problems with it. I know a lot of folks don’t like it but I think a lot of it has to do with your location, change in humidity, moisture in the wood, etc. I have the occasional person that will tell me that my table will spontaneously combust because I used pocket holes. I can attest to building lots of tables this way with no problems and seeing hundreds more. I’ve only ever heard of one real problem and that was a table leg that lifted off the ground by a 1/2″. To me thats not a huge deal because I’m not building fine furniture. Sorry for the long winded answer, hope this helps.

  • Brittany

    Gorgeous! I’m looking for plans to seat 8. Any ideas?

    • Thanks Brittany! If you add 24″ in length to the top and center support this one it will seat 8.

  • Hi Jamison,
    Really love the table. I would like to build it with two 20″ butterfly leaves so that we can expand it for family get togethers. Have you any experience with butterfly hardware? I have not seen any drawings as to how these are installed, and the necessary framing. Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Bob

    • Thanks Bob! Unfortunately I don’t have any experience with butterfly hardware. That being said I would love to see how it turns out for you and may incorporate it into future designs.

  • Janel Walker

    Love this table but want a counter height table. Suggestions on modifications to this table to make it more of a square counter height?

    • Thanks Janel! The square top should be straight forward but for the legs I would suggest getting rid of the center support and making the legs a cross. Like a pedestal design. Hope that helps.

      • Janel Walker

        Yes, thank you!

  • Kris Dysert

    What did you use to cut the corner detail? I don’t see anything in the list of required tools that looks like it could do that, but I’m very new to woodworking. Thanks!

    • It sure isn’t listed and I’m fixing that right now. We used a jig saw to cut out the corner detail.

      • Kris Dysert

        Awesome, thanks!!!

  • Bryan Quiroz

    Hey, Jamison I ran into a snag while assembling the top. It looks like the width is meant to be 39.5″. I was lucky to have had extra 2x6s, but I would hate for anyone else to cut their boards short.

    • Thanks Bryan, I should probably add a note to cut those to length.

  • Keri L Smith

    Where do you find kiln dried wood… I am sure the local “big boxes” do not carry dried woods.

  • Helen Haney

    HI Jamison- I want my hubby to build this table but we need it to be at minimum 120 inches. But maybe as long as 144. Needs to seat 12 comfortably. Maybe 14. Was thinking 120 would do good for 12 and 144 would be good for 14. Please let me know your thoughts on how we need to alter this design to accommodate? Thank you so much!

    • Wow thats gonna be one heck of a table! In order to make the top as long as you like I would add another 38 1/2″ 2×8 running across the center. My suggestion for the beam that runs along the base of the table would be to make another table side and use it as a center brace for the table. Hope that helps and happy building.

  • Jay Vance

    Thanks for the plans! Do you worry at all about the breadboard ends being unsupported? Are pocket screws and glue strong enough to support someone putting their elbows and some weight on the table?

    • The breadboard on the ends are plenty strong. You shouldn’t run into any issue with them, Im sure at some point my children and wife have walked on the table and it’s completely fine.

  • Brian McLaughlin

    Hi Jamison, did you sand the wood for this table at all before finishing it?

  • Nick

    Jamison, do you have specs for a bench? If not I’m sure I can come up with something, just thought I might save a few steps if you already had some drawn up, thanks

  • Jonathon Jensen

    Do you have any suggestion on building a bench for this table to match the design?

  • Bree

    Hi Jamison,
    Can you tell me what color stain was used on the base for this table?

  • Da C

    Jamison,
    Your plans look great.
    My question is:
    What are the dimensions of the cut-outs on the Monastery table? You show how to cut them out but don give the dimensions?